Fun Facts About Jade



Jade is a beautiful and unique stone used throughout history for its aesthetic value and healing properties. Here are some fun facts about this fascinating mineral!


  • The term "jade" comes from the Spanish phrase "piedra de ijada," which means "stone for the ache in the side." When Spanish explorers arrived in Central America, they saw the Mayans and Aztecs holding Jade minerals to their sides. The natives could treat or ease different aches and pains via jade.


  • The Chinese refer to jade as "yu," which means "heavenly" or "imperial." Therefore, it is the imperial gem in Chinese culture.


  • The Chinese character for jade is the same as the "king" (王), symbolizing the connection between heaven, earth, and humanity.


  • The ancient Chinese character for "emperor" is "皇," meaning white jade.


  • According to the great philosopher Confucious, the jade crystal represents 11 essential virtues of a decent person. Hence, a decent person will always wear something made of jade.


  • Jade, usually a green stone, is the official gemstone of British Columbia, where considerable amounts are available in Lillooet and Cassiar areas. In addition, it is Alaska's official gemstone.


  • The best five percent of jade stones are some of the most expensive and sought after in the world.


  • The jade gemstone is a decorative stone. The term "jade" refers to two metamorphic rocks composed of diverse silicate minerals, one of which is jade nephrite and the other is jadeite. The two types of jade are essentially identical in appearance.


  • Jadeite is a silicate of sodium and aluminum, while nephrite is a silicate of calcium and magnesium.


  • The two different types of jade, when worked and polished, can usually be distinguished by their appearance alone. The nephrite's fine luster is oily, while that of jadeite is glassy.


  • Where is jadeite found? The jadeite mineral is mined all over the world, including Burma, Guatemala, and Russia. The mining of nephrite jade takes place in Siberia, China, Korea, and New Zealand.


  • The value of jadeite depends upon three important criteria: color, translucency, and texture.


  • Jadeite from Burma is the most expensive jade you can find.


  • Canada jade, also called BC jade or Canadian jade, is a nephrite jade containing iron, chromium, and other metals.


  • Canadian jade mines contribute more than 70% of the world's yearly production. Yet, jade mining doesn't have a high profile in Canada, possibly because the mineral-rich country extracts around 60 different resources from the earth, including iron, gold, copper, silver, oil, uranium, and diamonds.


  • Myanmar contributes about 70% of the world's supply of high-quality jadeite today. Most of the jadeite in Myanmar is exported to other nations, primarily Asia, for use in jewelry, art, and ornaments.


  • The jade crystal trade in Myanmar is worth more than $30bn (£24bn) yearly.


  • Nephrite jade is usually creamy white (known as "mutton fat" in China) and a light shade of green. In contrast, jadeite traditionally has been available in a range of hues, including blue, red, black, lavender, white, pink, gray, and dark green.


  • The most highly prized variety of jadeite gems is an emerald-green hue, and the most jadeite color is a pale green.


  • Nephrite jade in New Zealand, known as pounamu in the Māori language, is highly valued is vital in Māori culture.


  • Some jades come from mines, but most jade stones come from streams found among pebbles.


  • The jadeite stone is rarer than nephrite and is more precious.


  • Many people believe that authentic jade gems are only available in green (imperial jade), but they also come in various shades.


  • In addition, the different colors of jade have different meanings. Black jade, for example, is a protective stone, while purple jade promotes laughter and happiness.


  • The most valuable jade gemstone you can find is imperial jade, also called Fei Cui, which features a vibrant emerald-green hue and a high level of transparency.


  • The Chinese also believed in jade jewelry's healing abilities. According to myth, jade bangles shaped from a single block guard the user. In Chinese culture, there are several stories of individuals becoming seriously ill or having accidents while wearing a carved jade bangle, only for the bracelet to break precisely, resulting in the wearer's recovery from sickness or walking away unscathed from the accident. The correctly carved jade piece could absorb negative energy and protects the wearer.


  • In Chinese culture, Jade jewelry reflects the user's life, becoming more brilliant and vibrant during good times or dimmer during hard times.


  • Jadeite crystals have a hardness between 6.0 and 7.0 on the Mohs scale of mineral hardness, while nephrite gems are slightly softer, between 6.0 to 6.5 on the Mohs scale.


  • Chinese jade is jade mined or carved in China. Chinese jade is the primary hardstone of Chinese sculpture. Although deep and bright green jadeite is better known in Europe.


  • The unique property of jade is its hardness; it breaks into pieces when subjected to pressure, making this gemstone an easier subject for carving intricate designs deep into a rock or sculpture.


  • The toughness of jade material made it a favorite of ancient people in China for use in tools, weapons, knives, axes, etc.


  • In China, jade carving has a long history. A jade carving might symbolize various things, depending on the forms of small sculptures. A jade shaped like a bat is associated with happiness, while a butterfly means long life.


  • The jade dragon embodies these qualities and represents man's continual pursuit of balance, well-being, and contentment.


  • Jade dragons are so precious to the Chinese that they are often given as gifts to mark milestones such as birthdays and weddings.


  • In China, the jade dragon also plays a vital role in meditation, one of the eight branches of Chinese medicine.


  • In China, Jade is known as 'the stone of heaven' and was once more valuable than gold material.


  • Because jade is a very dense gemstone, it is much heavier than most stones. A jade stone of the same size as a diamond, for example, would be much heavier than a diamond. This weight is why jade (and most other colored gemstones) are measured in millimeters, not in carats.


  • It can be challenging to distinguish between a genuine jade stone and fake jade, but there are definite differences between them. Genuine jade is pretty heavy as it has a high density. It's usually heavier than it looks and heavier than comparable gems of a similar size and appearance.


  • In addition, natural jade is a cold stone (it takes a while to warm up in your hands). It is tough and, therefore, difficult to break. Natural jade also has tiny fractures within its structure, which are hard to see with the naked eye.


  • Often objects are mislabelled as jade; for example, "Mexican jade" is used for green-dyed calcite or travertine common in vases, chess pieces, desk sets, and other ornamental objects.


  • As part of their long history and culture, the Chinese value jade jewelry and artwork tremendously. Jade gemstones in China's jade market are such valuable gems that they sell for the same price per carat as diamonds do in the United States.


  • The best quality jade is usually cut into cabochons and used in Jade jewelry. These cabochons are often not calibrated to make the most of the raw jades and gain the highest yield.


  • A jade ring usually has a simple bezel setting holding the stone in place. The most difficult part of making a jade ring is carving the stone to the desired shape and then polishing it to a high luster.


  • Sometimes a single piece of jade rough is used to create an entire piece of Jade jewelry. These are called hololiths and include everything from a jade ring to a bangle. Jade hololith jewelry is often very costly because a lot of wastage of raw jades occurs during the cutting process.


  • Dyed jade is common. To prepare for the acetic acid dye solution, the clean jadeite is heated gradually to expand the gaps within the grains. All air in the jade is driven out via a vacuum allowing for quicker absorption of the dye. Finally, it's immersed in a pre-mixed dye solution for days or weeks—depending on the type of jadeite and the colorants used—before being taken out for cleaning.


  • Type B treatment is standard in dyed jade. Type B treat is when jade is subjected to corrosive chemical bleaching and later impregnated with polymers.


  • Maw Sit Sit is a rock with a bright chrome-green color mined in Myanmar. It has a very similar appearance to jade. Maw sit sit is composed of jadeite, albite, and kosmochlor (a mineral related to jadeite).


  • Different colors of jade have different spiritual benefits. For example, lavender jade is an excellent crystal for retreats or meditations as a spiritual purification stone.


  • The most expensive piece of jade jewelry is a jade necklace featuring a ruby and diamond clasp by Cartier. This piece once belonged to the American heiress Barbara Hutton from the Woolworth fortune. This piece of jade jewelry was sold at a Sotheby's Hong Kong auction in April 2014 for $27.44 million. This selling price was well above Sotheby's Hong Kong $12.8 million estimates for the jade necklace.


  • Be careful when buying jade jewelry, as not everything material marked jade is authentic jade. For example, "yellow jade" does not refer to a genuine jade or jadeite stone but to a trade name for cloudy quartz with a pale to mid-dark yellow coloration - sometimes all in the same piece. Inclusions are a common occurrence in yellow jade. It may also be known as "golden jade" or "buttercream quartz."


  • Purple jade, also known as Turkiyenite and lavender jade, is a precious stone that forms huge masses. Whether it is called purple jade or lavender jade depends on the color, as the hue varies from pale lilac to deep purple, and it usually has white specks from quartz inclusions.


  • Orange jade is a typical orange nephrite and may bear a dark golden color. It is often mistaken for citrine because orange jade is among the rarest jade varieties you will ever come across.


  • During the Chinese New Year, Jade is a popular gift, especially Jade pendants because most believe they ward off evil and bring good luck.