Fun Facts About Aquamarine



Many gemstones have an interesting story behind them, and aquamarine is no exception. For instance, have you ever wondered how aquamarine got its name or what gives it that special color? Learn some interesting aquamarine facts and get up close and personal with this exquisite stone.


  • Aquamarine is the official birthstone for March and the traditional gift for the 19th wedding anniversary.


  • Aquamarine is a semi-precious gem that belongs to the beryl family, including emerald and morganite.


  •  Aquamarine and emerald are beryllium aluminum silicates, but emerald's coloring comes from trace amounts of chromium (and sometimes vanadium). In contrast, aquamarine obtains its blue color from iron impurities within colorless beryl (goshenite).


  • Aquamarine gemstones are almost chemically identical to emeralds.


  • The amount of iron in each aquamarine stone's structure determines the depth of color; thus, the color varies. Aquamarine crystal's colors range from sea-foam green, pale blue, blue-green, and deep teal.


  • Aquamarine gems rate 7.5 on the Mohs hardness scale, making them good for everyday jewelry. This rating makes aquamarine gemstones relatively hard gemstones, making them suitable for daily wear.


  • Because of its hardness ranking on the Mohs Scale, aquamarine stones can become damaged and scratched up. You should take care and never store your aquamarine jewelry next to a gem that has a harder surface. You should only wash stones in warm water, not hot water, and avoid any hard chemical treatment.


  • Aquamarine stones are most often faceted to be "eye-clean,"-meaning the gemstones do not have any inclusions visible to the naked eye.


  • The name aquamarine comes from the Latin words "aqua marina," which means "seawater." It references the similarity of the gemstone's light blue color and clarity to the ocean's.


  • However, the name aquamarine was not always known by this nautical name. The lovely greenish-blue gemstones used to be known by the name "sea-green beryl."


  • Another beryl closely related to aquamarine is the golden beryl. The two stones are often found together in the same deposit. What makes the golden beryl unique compared to aquamarine is the inclusion of uranium in the stone alongside the iron.


  • The gemstone aquamarine is a precious stone that is very hard to find. The earth only yields 8 tons of raw aquamarine stones for every 100 tons of rock, making it extremely rare and valuable.


  • Mines extracting gem-quality material exist in Pakistan, Kenya, Sri Lanka, and Madagascar.


  • The highest-quality and most valuable aquamarines come from Columbia and Brazil, but even the Colorado Rockies have caches of the gem. Other mines extracting gem-quality aquamarine crystals exist in Kenya, Zambia, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Russia, Tanzania, Nigeria, and Madagascar.


  • The state of Colorado in the USA also produces some of the finest specimens of aquamarine.


  • The Aquamarine gemstone was officially recognized as the official state gemstone in 1971.


  • Many stones on the market today are heat-treated, including aquamarine gemstones. However, while some stones like Blue Topaz can be seriously affected by heat treatment, aquamarine stays the same, becoming a much deeper blue. These heat-treated stones will be less valuable than a natural gem of the same hue.


  • Decorative jewelry and protective amulets using aquamarines have dated back as far as 500 B.C.


  • The ancient Romans believed that the magnificent gem had miraculous healing properties and could cure medical ailments like liver, stomach, and throat problems and reduce fluid retention.


  • Historically, it was a particularly popular gemstone amongst sailors. When leaving on long voyages, sailors would take an aquamarine stone to protect them from seasickness and any unexpected accidents.


  • The world's largest aquamarine stone was discovered in the late 1980s. Three Brazilian miners stumbled upon a huge aquamarine stone in Minas Gerais, Brazil. Unfortunately, the crystal was dropped and broken into three separate pieces.


  • The world's largest cut aquamarine, named the Don Pedro, is on display at the Natural History Museum at the Smithsonian in Washington, D.C. The stunning Dom Pedro Aquamarine is situated at the Smithsonian's display case just 30 feet from the Hope Diamond.


  • Natural aquamarine stones are calming; they help crystal healers soothe overactive nerves.


  • Aquamarine, the Pisces birthstone, is a beautiful sunstone associated with Neptune and water signs, all about embracing the sweet flow and surging of the water element. Furthermore, the Pisces birthstone can stimulate and balance your throat chakra while forming a strong bridge to the heart chakra.