Fun Facts About Turquoise


The turquoise stone is the birthstone for December, and it is no surprise that this beautiful blue-green gemstone is a favorite among jewelry collectors.


Here are some fun facts about turquoise:


  • Turquoise is the traditional birthstone for December, which means wearing turquoise brings good luck to anyone born in December. Though the notion of ​birthstones has been around for millennia, the turquoise birthstone was formally designated in December 1912.


  • Turquoise is the national gem of Tibet.


  • It is also the recognized celebratory gemstone for the 11th wedding anniversary.


  • Turquoise is one of the zodiac stones for those born under the sign Sagittarius (between November 22 and December 21), the end of the harvest season, and the beginning of winter. Sagittarius's signs are happy, sympathetic, and fearless, and their attitude toward life is extremely optimistic.


  • The name turquoise is derived from the French, pierre turquoise, meaning "Turkish stone," because the trade routes that brought Turquoise to Europe from the mines in central Asia went through Turkey, and Venetian merchants often bought the greenish-blue stone in Turkish bazaars.


  • Turquoise is a blue to gray-green mineral consisting of copper aluminum phosphate. The mineral is a hydrated phosphate of aluminum, including a small percent of copper.


  • The gemstone's blue coloring can be attributed to the presence of copper, while aluminum adds a greenish hue to the gem.


  • How is turquoise formed? The mineral turquoise creates a chemical reaction when water containing specific minerals such as copper and aluminum seeps through a rock. It develops in veins, which later turn into a clump of turquoise.


  • Turquoise, the December birthstone, comes in various colors ranging from white to powder blue to sky blue, blue-green, and yellowish-green.


  • The wonderful greenish-blue color of turquoise gemstones is due to iron-oxidizing upon exposure to air and moisture, particularly saltwater.


  • Turquoise gems have a waxy to subvitreous luster and are usually opaque, although sometimes they feature semitransparent properties in thin sections.


  • The finest turquoise is a semi-translucent, deep blue variety known as robins egg turquoise.


  • The mineral turquoise has an average hardness of 6 on the Mohs Scale of Hardness, slightly above that of window glass. This hardness level makes even the smallest particles of the mineral fragile when exposed to force.


  • Turquoise mines exist in the arid regions of the world, commonly in places that have been either altered by volcanic activity or alongside copper, zinc, or gold mines. Turquoise mines exist in various regions of the Himalayas and Mexico, Afghanistan, Iran, China, Tibet, and Australia.


  • Only a small amount of mined turquoise rocks are cut into finished stones or suitable for making jewelry without heat treatment. These artificial treatments make turquoise rocks stable enough for cutting and durable enough for jewelry or improve their color and marketability.


  • The price of turquoise stones ranges from $1 to $10 per carat but can range from $0.05 to $1000 per carat depending on the quality.


  • Turquoise gemstones generally cost between $1 and $10 per carat, although the price fluctuates depending on the grade. The value of turquoise gemstones decreases with the increase of a green tint, lightening of color, and mottling.


  • The Turquoise gem is porous and absorbent. When exposed to water or oil, it will absorb it like a sponge. This may cause the gemstone to change its color. Hence, you should not wear turquoise while taking a shower or doing household chores.


  • Arizona is home to the very sought-after Sleeping Beauty Turquoise in the southwestern United States. The name "Sleeping Beauty Turquoise" comes from the hilltop where you find these stones; it resembles a woman sleeping with her arms crossed.


  • The turquoise stone is the only gemstone to have a color named after it. Very few minerals have a color that is so well-known, so characteristic, and so impressive that the name of the mineral has become so commonly used. Only three other minerals - gold, silver, and copper - have a color used more often in the common language than turquoise.


  • Turquoise is associated with the healing energy of water, the life-giving element that sustains the planet, and the origins of life itself. The Turquoise crystal's unique ability to support healing intentions and overall well-being is due to this water energy of renewal and rejuvenation. Turquoise helps with stress alleviation and the elimination of negative energies by guiding the wearer to a state of serenity and tranquility.


  • Turquoise gems are among the oldest minerals on earth and are only about 200 million years younger than diamonds.


  • From the Persians to the Ancient Egyptians to the Native Americans, its striking blue hue with rich varieties of brown and black veining - also known as the matrix - has caught the eye of many a discerning lover of high-quality gemstones all over the world.


  • In ancient Egypt, the Egyptians revered turquoise crystal to the point where it had its own goddess, Hathor. Hathor, often known as the Lady of Turquoise, was Ra's daughter. The Egyptians associated turquoise gems with fertility, sex, pregnancy, and childbirth because of their color. Even Queen Nefertiti was often depicted wearing a crown with turquoise-colored stones.


  • Some ancient cultures believed that the stone could change color and warn its wearer of impending danger.


  • For centuries, turquoise was considered to be a holy stone and carrier of good fortune by people all over the world.


  • Turquoise is one of the most popular stones used in Native American jewelry. Native Americans have been making turquoise jewelry for centuries. The stone is thought to have healing properties and is popular for ceremonies and rituals. Turquoise is a sacred stone to the Navajo, who believe it has the power to protect against evil spirits.


  • The most popular fake turquoise stones include howlite and magnesite, naturally white. Magnesite has real black veining, much like that of turquoise. Dyed chalcedony, jasper, and marble are less common substitutes and less convincing than real turquoise.