Fun Facts About Ruby Gemstones



Rubies are some of the most popular and recognized ​gemstones in the world. They are known for their remarkable colors, so ruby gems are highly-prized and used in jewelry and other decorative objects. Read on for a few fun facts about rubies.


  • Only four gemstones are a part of the Precious Gem category in gemology. Rubies are one of the four precious gemstones, and the other three are diamonds, sapphires, and emeralds.


  • In addition to being July's Birthstone, the ruby stone is also a traditional gift for those celebrating their 15th or 40th anniversary. Many cultures have strong ties to it being a symbol of eternal love and commitment, making it a great gemstone for a wedding ring.


  • The ruby was initially named "ratnaraj." The Sanskrit "ratnaraj" means "king of precious stones." Ancients believed it surpassed all other precious stones in virtue, and its value exceeded even that of the diamond.


  • The word ruby also comes from the Latin word rubens, which means red.


  • Most people don't realize that ruby and sapphire are gems of the mineral corundum. They are members of the corundum family.


  • Corundum comes in many other colors. Pink corundum is also called pink sapphire, and other times called pink ruby, depending on the hue, region, and personal opinion.


  • Natural rubies come in various hues, from dark crimson to pigeon blood red and pinkish red. This red hue comes from trace amounts of the mineral chromium.


  • The most desirable shade of ruby jewelry is called "pigeon's blood ."This type of ruby jewelry features pure stones with a tinge of blue, and each carat is estimated to be worth millions of dollars.


  • Translucent rubies are transparent, extremely valuable, and rare, whereas opaque rubies have so many inclusions that it is impossible to see through the stone. Inside the gemstone, white, silky strands of the mineral rutile run through and gather together. The more rutile the rubies contain, the more they are called opaque rubies.


  • Translucent rubies are more expensive than opaque rubies. Opaque ruby jewelry is also more likely to break due to the impurities that make them less durable.


  • A ruby gemstone is one of the most durable gemstone crystals globally. Ruby measures a nine on the Mohs scale of hardness making rubies the hardest stones after diamonds. According to the Mohs scale, sapphires and rubies and only slightly softer than diamond jewels.


  • Natural ruby stones have been found worldwide, including in Myanmar (formerly Burma), Africa, Australia, and the USA. A few rubies were discovered in the US states of Montana, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Wyoming.


  • The world's largest supplier of rubies is Myanmar, where 90% of the world's rubies come from.


  • Most of the highest-quality rubies come from Myanmar; thus, top-quality rubies are "Burmese Rubies."


  • One of the most important reasons for Burmese rubies' high price is their distinctive, highly saturated deep red color due to the high chromium content in the earth. The color is specific to rubies found in Mogok mines.


  • Unfortunately, the famous Burmese mines in Myanmar are now almost entirely depleted, making Burmese ruby gems ever scarcer and more expensive than ever to find for jewelry use.


  • Although not the finest quality, rubies acceptable for jewelry come from Viet Nam (a slightly purple color), Thailand (dark red color tending towards brown and a modulated deep red), Ceylon-Rubies (raspberry-colored), and East Africa (gorgeous colors from light to dark red). Poorer quality rubies come from Northern Pakistan, Cashmere, Tadzhikistan, Laos, Nepal, Afghanistan, and India.


  • Each natural ruby contains impurities and flaws in its crystal structure regardless of the jewelry price. These imperfections are "silk," They can help you distinguish between synthetic and genuine gemstones. Almost all rubies have faults, although some are less obvious than others. Rubies stones without flaws are highly unusual and usually flagged on the gem market as possible counterfeits.


  • According to my myth, ruby crystals promote harmony, and emotional balance, boost confidence, bring success, and ensure everlasting passion between a couple.


  • In modern times ruby has become a symbol of profound love.


  • Natural rubies, sapphires, and emeralds generate more economic impact than other gemstones combined.


  • Rubies occasionally show an internal, star-like formation called asterism called "star rubies," and because asterism is rare, they can be more valuable than regular rubies.


  • Ruby stones often undergo heat treatment to improve their clarity and color. Under extreme heat, above 1700 degrees Celsius, the silk inclusions dissolve and make ruby's color a more desirable shade while enhancing the clarity. This treatment can turn a colorless ruby into a blue ruby.


  • The first lab-grown rubies were showcased at the Paris World Fair in 1900 by Auguste Verneuil.


  • Synthetic rubies can be identified from actual diamonds by their lack of inclusions. Simulated rubies emerged in jewelry production in the 1850s, also known as garnet doublets, where a piece of garnet fuses with a pinkish-red piece of glass. This fusion creates a gem that looks like a much more expensive ruby.


  • The precious red stone played a part in laser technology! Theodore H. Maiman created the first functional laser in 1960 using a synthetic ruby crystal.


  • Both natural and synthetic rubies are instrumental in various applications—such as watchmaking, medical instruments, and lasers—because of their incredible strength and red fluorescence.


  • The 8,500-carat Liberty Bell Ruby is the world's largest mined ruby crystal. The stunning East African Liberty Bell Ruby weighs four pounds, is eight and a half thousand carats, and is sculpted into a miniature form of the Liberty Bell.


  • According to the Guinness World Records, Rajiv Golcha of India owns the largest ruby, weighing 21,955 g (48 lbs 6.43 oz) and measuring 310 x 165 x 140 mm (12.20 x 6.49 x 5.51 in). The largest ruby, dubbed "The King Ruby," is displayed at India's Prestige Gems & Jewels store.


  • The finest rubies that weigh over 10 carats can sell for much more than a similar-sized diamond. Some large rubies have fetched sale prices upwards of $225,000 per carat. Comparably sized diamonds average a sales price of around $125,000 per carat. Rubies of this magnitude are extremely rare than larger-sized diamond stones, which explains the price difference.


  • The Sunrise Ruby is the world's most expensive ruby, most expensive colored gemstone, and most expensive gemstone other than a diamond.


  • Elizabeth Taylor famously wore rubies. While on holiday in 1957, Taylor's husband, Mike Todd, presented her with a red leather Cartier box containing ruby jewelry. It included a suite of 24 rubies placed in a diamond-encrusted bib necklace.


  • Red spinel was assumed to be a ruby until scientists discovered it was a completely different gemstone in the late 18th century! One of the most famous examples of this mistaken identity is the "The Black Prince's Ruby," a 170-carat irregular spinel bead that has been in the British Royal Family's possession since 1367. Above the Cullinan II diamond, it sits in the center of the Imperial State Crown of the United Kingdom.


  • In the 13th century, ground rubies were considered a cure for liver problems.


  • Prophetic In the Middle Ages, rubies were used to predict impending danger by turning a darker color. Likewise, carrying rubies into battle was thought to lead to victory.


  • According to lore, rubies symbolize power and protection. When worn as a talisman, ruby protects warriors in battle. One modern allusion to this legend is in The Wizard of Oz. Dorthy's ruby slippers protect her from evil in The Wizard of Oz.


There you go, some fun facts about rubies. If you like this article, don't forget to share it.