Fun Facts About Peridot



Peridot is a fascinating gemstone for those who love unusual stones. While most people know that peridot is the August birthstone and that it symbolizes good luck, there are many other interesting facts about this stone that are less well-known:


  • The name “peridot” comes from the French word “peritot,” which means green.


  • In the past, peridot referred to all gemstones with a green color, but today we know that there are many gemstones that are green and not all of those gemstones are peridots.


  • Apart from being the official birthstone for August, it is also given as the traditional 16th wedding anniversary gift.


  • Peridot is a gem-quality form of the mineral olivine. Olivine is a very abundant mineral, but gem-quality peridot is kinda rare.


  • Peridot is a green gemstone that is unique in the world of gems. It comes in only one colour: green! Some common peridot colors include moss green, lime green, emerald green, and brownish-green.


  • The color of green is determined by the amount of iron in it. The amount of iron content in the crystal structure of each peridot determines which shade of green it emits. The more iron in the stone, the deeper the green color.


  • The most valued shade of Peridot is a deeply saturated forest green color with a slight yellow tone to it. This color is easily found in Peridots, weighing more than 10 carats.


  • Most gemstones are created in the Earth's crust. Peridot and diamond are the only two exceptions. They're formed deep down in the Earth's mantle.


  • Just like diamonds, peridot gemstones are brought to the earth's surface when a volcano erupts.
  • It rates 6.5-7 on the Mohs scale of mineral hardness.


  • Like all other gemstones, Peridot is also graded on four things – color, cut, clarity and carat weight.


  • Prices for peridot gemstones can range from under $100 per carat to several thousand dollars per carat, depending on cut, color, and size.


  • Peridots frequently have slight flaws, and flawless stones are extremely rare and difficult to come by.


  • Peridot crystals are found on five continents. The major sources are Burma, the U.S. (Arizona), Norway, Brazil, China, Australia, and Pakistan.


  • Peridot has been found at some meteorite crash sites, making it one of the few gems known to exist outside of our solar system!


  • Stardust, NASA's explorer spacecraft, returned to Earth in 2006 with mineral samples collected near the sun. They discovered gem-quality peridot, which is thought to be as old as our solar system, among other particles.


  • If you’re wondering where peridot crystals come from, there are only a few places in the world where they occur naturally. One of these locations is in Hawaii, which led to peridot gems being called “the Hawaiian birthstone” — as well as the official state gem.


  • In 2018, shortly after the Kīlauea volcano erupted in Hawaii, people found small green pebbles in lava deposits. Later the pebbles were identified as peridots.


  • Peridot gemstones were thought to be Pele's tears in Hawaiian folklore. Pele is the volcanic goddess, and her temper is considered to be as volatile as lava.


  • Topazo Island (now Zabargad or St. John's Island) in the Egyptian Red Sea was the principal source of peridot in the ancient world.


  • Peridot is Egypt's national gemstone, and it was once referred to as the "gem of the sun" by ancient Egyptians.


  • Peridot was given the name "evening emerald" by the ancient Romans because, unlike true emeralds, it maintained its vibrant hue throughout the evening hours rather than darkening.


  • Peridots and an emeralds may now be distinguished easily. Throughout history, however, the two jewels have frequently been confused for one another.


  • People thought the magnificent 200-carat green gems gracing the altar of the Three Holy Kings in Germany's Cologne Cathedral of Saint Peter were emeralds for centuries. They're peridots, not emeralds.


  • One of the most famous peridots is a 46.16-karat stone found in Pakistan and now on display at the Smithsonian Museum.


  • Wearing a peridot stone is a symbol of peace & good fortune.