FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS: CITRINE


Welcome to our Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) section! Here, you will find the answers to some of the most popular questions about citrine. 



WHAT IS THE MEANING OF CITRINE?


Citrine comes from the French term "citron" which means lemon. It is also derived from the Latin term "citrina" because of its pale yellow citrusy color and iron content.



HOW CITRINE IS FORMED?


Most citrine on the market forms when amethyst and smokey quartz undergo a heat treatment process, either natural or induced.



CAN CITRINE BE CLEAR?


Yes, clear citrine quartz is legit. However, clear citrine quartz is relatively rare. Most citrine has some color impurities that give it a yellow, orange, or brown tint.



CAN CITRINE GO IN WATER?


Yes, citrine can go in the water. Citrine does not dissolve in water.



CAN CITRINE GO IN SALT WATER?


Placing citrine in salt water for extended periods is not advisable as it can lead to breakage or discoloration of the stone.



CAN CITRINE BE IN THE SUN?


Citrine is a form of translucent quartz that you should not expose to sunlight. If you expose citrine to UV rays, its color will fade due to its trace iron.



WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN CITRINE VS. AMETHYST?


One difference between citrine vs. amethyst is color. Citrine is a yellow to an orange-brown variety of quartz, while amethyst is a violet variety of quartz. Both citrine and amethyst are transparent to translucent. Citrine and amethyst are also equally hard, with a Mohs hardness score of 7.



ARE CITRINE AND AMETHYST THE SAME STONE?


No, citrine and amethyst are not the same stone. Citrine is a type of quartz that ranges in color from yellow to orange, while amethyst is a type of quartz that ranges from purple to lavender. Although citrine is less valuable than amethyst, it is still considered a semiprecious stone.



WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN REAL CITRINE VS. HEAT-TREATED AMETHYST?


You might not be aware that over 95% of the citrine on the market is heat-treated citrine or "phony" citrine. To make heat-treated citrine (also known as burnt amethyst), an amethyst crystal is baked at temperatures of approximately 800-900 degrees Fahrenheit, transforming the color to darker hues of orange depending on how long it is "baked."

Real citrine (untreated) is rarer and more valuable than burnt amethyst.



WRAPPING UP


We hope that this FAQ has been helpful in answering some of your citrine questions. If you have any other questions, feel free to contact us and we'll be happy to help. Thanks for reading!