HOW TO TELL IF AQUAMARINE IS REAL


Aquamarine is a beautiful blue-green gemstone that has been treasured since ancient times. But how can you tell if an aquamarine is real? There are a few things to look for when trying to determine whether an aquamarine is real or fake.



1. EXAMINE THE COLOR


The best way to identify a genuine aquamarine stone is by looking at its color. In its natural form, a genuine aquamarine will have a pale blue color similar to seawater. It may also display a slightly green or yellow tint.


The color of a real aquamarine depends on the angle it is viewed from. Therefore, at one angle, it may look very pale, while from another view, it may display an intense blue. In contrast, glass imitations will have the same color no matter what angle you view them from.



2. CHECK OUT THE HARDNESS


Another way you can tell a genuine aquamarine stone from a faux stone is by its hardness--aquamarines don't collect scratches easily. However, they can easily scratch glass and other similar soft surfaces. If you notice any visible scratches on the stone in question, think carefully before purchasing it.



3. CHECK THE CLARITY



A genuine aquamarine stone will have excellent clarity and transparency. If you spot inclusions on the questionable stone, be very suspicious, as almost every genuine aquamarine stone is eye-clean.

 


4. USE A LIGHT SOURCE


One of the most important things you can do when trying to determine if a piece of aquamarine is real or fake is to examine it in a light source. Whether you use natural sunlight or artificial light, hold the stone up and look at the way the light passes through it. Real aquamarine is typically transparent or translucent, meaning that light should be able to pass through it relatively easily. If the stone appears opaque or cloudy, likely, it's not real.



5. TOUCH IT


A genuine aquamarine stone is cool to the touch; glass imitations will be warmer to the touch because glass is a poor heat conductor.



6. LOOK AT ITS LUSTER



Examine the luster of the questionable stone. The luster of glass imitations is often more "gaudy" or "glassy" in appearance compared to genuine aquamarine stones.


Another thing to beware of is synthetic blue spinels. These are the artificial counterparts of stones like aquamarine. Synthetic blue spinels are produced easily in laboratories, using a combination of the mineral and chemical components found in genuine aquamarines.


However, a trained eye can distinguish a synthetic blue spinel gem from other beryls; the blue color is usually gaudy, its luster & fire are too bright, the luster appears glassy, and light dispersion is low.



7. USE A MICROSCOPE


Use a microscope; there are a few key things you can look for when trying to identify a glass imitation aquamarine.
First, look for any signs of bubbling in the gemstone. Glass imitations will usually show a bubble or two, even if these bubbles are too small to be detected with a pocket lens—or they may show "swirl marks" as a result of improper mixing of the components.


Bubbles provide conclusive evidence that the stone in question is glass since no natural mineral shows bubbles of this kind. Instead, natural aquamarine commonly shows layers of small crystals ("feathers") or tiny needle-like inclusions.



8. USE A CHELSEA COLOR FILTER



A Chelsea color filter is a small, hand-held tool that helps gemologists identify different types of stones. To use one, hold the filter up to your eye and look at the stone through it.


You can differentiate a synthetic blue spinel from an aquamarine by holding the stone under a strong light source and looking at it through a Chelsea color filter. The blue synthetic spinel will show a bright orange or red, while a natural aquamarine stone will appear a distinct green since it effectively cuts out the deep red.



9. CHECK THE PRICE


Aquamarine stones are easily available but still command a reasonable price. If the cost of aquamarine is extremely low, they are likely faux stones. Conversely, if the price is too high, the seller may be trying to take advantage of you. So do your research to get a ballpark idea of what a fair price for aquamarine should be before purchasing.


The cost of aquamarine varies depending on multiple factors. For example, larger aquamarine stones cost between $300 and $600 per carat. The most vibrant colors attract the highest prices, with exceptional quality Santa Maria aquamarines fetching over $1,000 per carat.



WRAPPING UP


So there you have it, our guide on how to tell if aquamarine is real. If you're still unsure about a particular stone, take it to a professional gemologist or jeweler for further examination. With their help, you can be sure that the aquamarine stone you're considering is the real thing. Thanks for reading!